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Web Resources People Moving home In London

Moving In London

Whether you’re moving to London, moving within London, or just looking to renew your interest in your surroundings, here are five websites to help you navigate your way through the capital and keep abreast of changes, as well as expose yourself to the very best, most exciting and entertaining things going on in town.

 

Living In London

www.livinginlondon.net

This excellent resource is a goldmine when it comes to working out what part of London you should live in, based on local facilities, transport links, housing, cost and people. Just click on a postcode and up comes information about shops, major roads, demographics and much more. From there, you can click onwards to find properties, landlords, agents and more. So, if you’re planning a move, either within the capital or moving there for the first time, you could do a lot worse than to start right here. That way, the whole process should seem less intimidating and less insurmountable.

 

Greater London Authority

www.london.gov.uk

Stay aware of how the Mayor of London and the London Assembly are handling their various responsibilities, including policing and crime, transport, environment, arts and culture, education and housing. Are you happy with the job they’re doing? Do you just want to know more about how things work? Then start here. It can help create a sense of engagement in your immediate surrounds and environment, so that you don’t just feel like a helpless, enfeebled observer, subject to the whims and fancies of others. A drop-down menu helps you find information pertinent to your borough and an Events Calendar makes it easy to stay in touch with exactly what’s going on, where and when.

 

Visit London

www.VisitLondon.com

If your fondness for the capital has become jaded after years or even decades of moving about, no one could blame you; it does happen to all of us from time to time. So many other concerns, all of them noisily vying for our time and attention, end up getting the better of us and before we know it, the shine has been taken off our experience of city life. It seems drab and joyless before we know it. However, there are easy solutions and remedies – you can often renew your love of London by seeing it through the eyes of a first-time (or second-time) visitor. So many attractions, sitting there right in front of us, go unnoticed because of busy lives or because the years of living here have left us blasé. All it takes is a quick decision and, hey presto, your love of London is revived and renewed within minutes.

 

Time Out London

www.timeout.com/london

Bars, restaurants, theatre, shops, gigs, and a hotline to the art world – Time Out London remains the market-leader of capital-centric magazines and since none of its online content is behind a paywall, you can come here to recommit to life in the city. Yes, some of its writing is snooty and mannered, but there’s plenty of good information here among the occasional bits of pseudo-intellectual posturing and blather. To determine what you want to do on your next night (or day) out, read user reviews as well as the findings of seasoned journalists. The 101 Things to do in London is a must-read if ever you’re stuck for ideas about how to make the most of your free time.

 

Transport For London

www.tfl.gov.uk

This site used to seem rather half-made and shoddy, but it’s upped its game over recent years, having to see off stiff competition from a variety of cutting-edge transport apps. It now holds its own and, apart from occasionally failing to flag up some of the fast routes from point A to point B, its journey planner frequently comes in useful. Although there’s still no official TFL app, and therefore no way to use it in offline mode, the site optimises itself for smartphones so provided you’ve got a connection, it can give you up-to-the-minute info, helping your journeys to become smoother and more seamless and, better yet, ensuring you know about closed station and signal failures, the wretched bane of Londoners everywhere, before you actually set out. Information for pedestrians and cyclists, as well as those looking to travel on the Thames, is here in full measure.
 

Lonely Planet London

www.lonelyplanet.com/england/london

You don’t have to be a traveller or a tourist to take advantage of the great free content from the long-established and trustworthy Lonely Planet. You may disagree with some of the strong opinions expressed here, but sometimes that’s half the fun. There’s an always changing roundup of the best things to do in the capital and much, much more, including restaurants, pubs, theatres, art spaces and bars. Sometimes, it’s only when you consult tourism and travel guides that you realise how exciting it is to live in one of the world’s best cities – often, it’s all too easy to forget that because daily concerns tear at us and bring us down.

 

Bookatable

www.bookatable.co.uk

Although this restaurant-finding online marketplace features places to eat throughout Europe, it is headquartered in London and is a particularly good bet when you want to be adventurous in the English capital and stray from the restaurants you already know and love. A whole lot of everything – from high-street chains through to Michelen-starred restaurants and little-known eateries – is here. If you’re fed up with your old favourites, then Bookatable will help you explore and make a booking somewhere new, and your knowledge of the capital’s restaurant scene will develop and grow at a considerable lick. In no time, you’ll be a mine of information for your friends and it’ll come in particularly useful when you have out-of-town visitors to stay and need to think of fun and cheerful places to go.